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Short  Title Garofalo
Full  Citation New York, Former private collection Garofalo,
RISM  ID
Provenance  &  Date Early  18c
Time  Frame 1700-1800
Contents
F Title Pp.  in  Source
4.10 Capriccio  X  sopra  un  soggetto 84-89
10.02 Canzon  Seconda  detta  la  Sabbatina 93-97
10.11 Canzon  Undecima  detta  la  Gardana 110-113
16.51 Canzona  prima 57-59
16.52 Canzona  seconda 60-63
16.53 Canzona  terza 64-65
16.54 Canzona  quarta 66-68
16.55 Canzona  quinta 68-69
16.56 Canzona  sesta 70-73
16.57 Canzona  settima 74-75
16.58 Canzona  ottava 76-77
16.59 Canzona  nona 78-79
16.60 Canzona  decima 80-81
16.61 Canzona  undecima 82-83
16.62 Canzona  decima  terza 90-93
16.63 Canzona  decima  quinta 98-101
16.64 Canzona  decima  sesta 102-103
16.65 Canzona  decima  settima 104-106
16.66 Canzona  decima  ottava 107-109
Modern  Editions  &  Facsimiles
Short  Title
Garofalo
Literature
Short  Title Pp.  in  Lit.
Garofalo (1922)
Hammond (1983) 293
Silbiger (1980-1) 147,  205
Related  Frescobaldi  Publ.
Canonical  Publ
CANZONI  (1645)
CAPRICCI  (1624-1642)
Notes This manuscript, probably dating from the early eighteenth century, was acquired “from an intinerant second-hand bookseller” by the noted composer and conductor Carlo Giorgio Garofalo (1886-1962), and passed on to his son Marcello Garofalo, who in 1983 sold it to the antiquariat of Wurlitzer-Bruck. Its present location is unknown, but Marcello Garofalo still possesses a photocopy of the manuscript. In his 1922 article, Carlo Giorgio Garofalo described the content of the manuscript as containing “27 fughe a 3 e 4 voci, una Sonata col flautina in la maggiore, un’Elevazione in sol minore, [e] 19 canzoni, in capo all prima delle quali leggasi Canzone P.a Frescobaldi.” Marcello Garofalo very kindly placed at our disposal a partial photocopy of the MS (beginning with the alleged Frescobaldi canzonas on p. 57), as well as a copy of an edition that his father had prepared for publication, but which was never published. Among the 19 canzonas are copies of F 4.08, F 10.02, and F 10.11. The other 16 canzonas are not known from other sources. F 16.51 and F 16.62 through F 16.66 might be by Frescobaldi; the others are likely of a later vintage.